Wondrous Words #418

WWWEvery week word-lovers post new words they’ve discovered while reading. It’s called Wondrous Words Wednesday and was created by Kathy at Bermuda Onion’s Weblog.

I found this word while reading the blurb for Poppy Mayberry by Jennie K. Brown.

telekinesis: “In the town of Nova, everyone is born with magical abilities — and Poppy’s telekinesis isn’t up to scratch!

Telekinesis is the supposed ability to move objects at a distance by mental power or other nonphysical means.

_______________________________

That’s all for me this week. Don’t forget to visit Kathy for more Wondrous Words Wednesday.

Posted in Wondrous Words | Leave a comment

First Paragraph: A Man of Some Repute (A Very English Mystery)

firstparagraphEvery Tuesday Diane at Bibliophile By the Sea shares the first paragraph of a book currently being read. Feel free to join the fun.

~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~~  ~

I discovered this British mystery series by Elizabeth Edmondson when I accidentally bought the third book in the series. I got half-way through when I decided I’d rather start with book #1. So here it is, and here’s how it begins:

 

Chapter One

England, 1953

Scene 1

By the time they reached Selchester, Hugo’s leg hurt like hell. It was a gritted-teeth job, and be struggled not to wince every time he had to change gear. Georgia was sitting beside him; she gave her brother a glance or two but did’t offer any sympathy. She’d said more than once that since his leg was the way it was, he would just have to get used to it, which practical and pragmatic response to his injury rather pleased him. But at the moment he wasn’t thinking of Georgia, or how he’d injured his leg, or regretting what it had done to him. He was just wondering if he could last out until they got to Selchester Castle and he could climb our of the car. They had stopped on the way, more often than he would have done in the old days, but nonetheless it was a four-hour drive from London and the longest stretch of time behind the wheel he’d attekpted since he’d been shot.

What do you think?

Would you keep reading?

Posted in First Paragraph | 3 Comments

My Week In Review

Hi everyone. Thanks for stopping by. I’m enjoying the sense of excitement that comes around this time of the year — the anticipation of the fun ahead. Right now we are looking forward to this week’s gathering of about twenty-five people. My son and daughter-in-law will make the turkey and a few other things, and everyone else will bring the rest of the menu. I’m going to make pumpkin pies and my husband will make his famous brussel sprouts with bacon. Before dinner begins its a tradition for each person to share one thing he or she is thankful for this year. The hardest part is keeping it to just one thing. I hope you too have an abundance of things for which you are thankful.

I’m thankful for audiobooks. With my diminished eye-sight, I’d be a non-reader without them. Plus, it allows me to be mobile while reading. This week I did a lot of “reading” while doing some deep cleaning. I listened to a light and sweet story set in modern-day Texas.

The Lilac Bouquet by Carolyn Brown is the story of Emmy Jo, a young woman determined to have a public wedding to break the spell of her mother. grandmother and great-grandmother. Her great-grandmother, who raised her, is okay with that, she just doesn’t like the family of Emmy Jo’s fiance. She also doesn’t like the man who Emmy Jo is about to take a four-month nursing job with. There are obviously some important secret from the past and Emmy Jo is determined to learn what they are. I enjoyed the unraveling of that secret and the opening of new relationships. I always love it when people in my age group are a key part of the story.  A very satisfying story.

I also read a new-to-me legal thriller, Special Circumstances by Seldon Siegel. I thoroughly enjoyed this book, primarily because of the characters, plus the setting – San Francisco. The main character, Mike Daley, really drew me in. As the story begins, Mike is leaving his partnership at one of San Francisco’s largest law firms. Prior to working at the law firm he was a public defender, and before that he was a priest. Quite a resume! Mike is opening his own one-man law firm, but even before the door is open he has his first client — a good friend at the old law firm is accused of a double murder right in the office.

The investigation seemed quite thorough. Mike involved friends — a former cop, his ex-wife, Rosie who is also a lawyer, and a few other key characters. Since the murder occurred right in the firm’s office, it felt like I was right there with all the juicy stuff — a little gossipy. I liked how deep this investigation went and all that was uncovered.

I am excited to find another good legal thriller as I truly love to read them. Lucky for me, there are six more in Seldon Siegel’s series. If you too like legal thrillers I recommend trying this one.

Away From the Blog:

As you know, I’m a huge Agatha Christie fan, so I’ve been patiently waiting for the new movie version of Murder On the Orient Express. My husband, who has never read the book, went to see that latest movie with me.

This is the classic story of a man murdered on a train in a compartment that is locked. Agatha Christie, and others, have written other “locked-door novels” but this one is quite dramatic, whether you’re reading the story or watching it. In addition there is a whole cast-list of classic characters.

The movie was very close to Agatha Christie’s story. What makes this movie better is the outstanding cast of actors and the incredibly beautiful scenery, set designs, and costumes. There is nothing like the big screen – the ability to be right there in that amazing story. Go see it before it leaves town.

I hope you all have a wonderful Thanksgiving week. Happy Reading!

 

Kenneth Branagh
Johnny Depp
Michelle Pfeiffer
Judi Dench
Penelope Cruz

Posted in Movies, Weekly Review | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Wondrous Words #417

WWWEvery week word-lovers post new words they’ve discovered while reading. It’s called Wondrous Words Wednesday and was created by Kathy at Bermuda Onion’s Weblog.

1.  I found this word in a NY Times headline:

whupping:  “Trump’s Whupping

This must be a regional word because I didn’t know that whup means to beat, thrash or defeat convincingly. Its a variant of whip. That makes sense.

_______________________________

2.  Also in The NY Times:

conflate: “But it’s still important not to conflate widespread cowardice with support . . “

I swear I’ve looked this word up before, but it still puzzled me. Conflate means to combine two or more things into one.

_______________________________

That’s all for me this week. Don’t forget to visit Kathy for more Wondrous Words Wednesday.

Posted in Wondrous Words | 3 Comments

First Paragraph: The Lilac Bouquet

firstparagraphEvery Tuesday Diane at Bibliophile By the Sea shares the first paragraph of a book currently being read. Feel free to join the fun.

~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~~  ~

I’m almost done reading this very sweet novel by Carolyn Brown. It’s a story involving multiple generations. Here’s how the story begins:

 

Chapter One

There are no secrets in Hickory, Texas—except for whatever was between Seth Thomas, Jesse Grady, and Tandy Massey. And since they were now in their early eighties, it might be that they’d take that secret to the grave with them. Usually Emmy Jo Massey’s grandmother, Tandy, laughed off rumors, but that night she was doing a tap dance on her soapbox,

“Over my damn dead body.” Tandy shook a wooden spoon at her great-granddaughter. “You are not going to work for Seth Thomas in any form or fashion, and I mean it. And you damn sure are not going to live in that house.”

What do you think? Would you keep reading?

Posted in First Paragraph | 8 Comments

My Week In Review

Hi Everyone. We’ve had a nice quiet week here in Windsor, Califonia. Thanks for stopping by.

Breaking Silence by Linda Castillo was an Audible Daily Deal. I listened and loved it. I’m now off on another new mystery series: Murder In Amish Country. The main character is one I love. Kate Burkholdeer is the Chief of Police in a small northeast Ohio town. The area is a mix of Amish, Mennonite and “English.” Breaking Silence featured the gruesome deaths of three members of an Amish family in the manure pit of the barn. Kate did a great job working through all the details and the suspects. Because she was raised Amishe has a good “in” with local Amish. They know her, plus she speaks Deutsche – the old German language.

This book is the third in the series, which means I have to go back and catch up. There are actually nine books all together so I’ll be busy for awhile. I don’t mind as the writing is quite good and it doesn’t seem to matter that I’m reading them out of order. My husband said he saw a TV series called Murder In Amish Country on Netflix, but it doesn’t seem to be there any more. I’ll have to try some of the other services. Have you read the books or watched the show?

~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~

I also read A Pocket Full of Rye — a good mystery by Agatha Christie. My favorite character, Miss Marple is the star of this story. There are actually three deaths, but it starts with the poisoning of the head of a business empire. Within a few days his young second wife is dead as is a young housemaid. The murders follow an old rhyme. Do you remember this one?

Sing a song of sixpence,
A pocket full of rye.
Four and twenty blackbirds,
Baked in a pie.

There are grains of rye in the pocket of one victim and the Blackbird Gold Mine is featured in the possible motive. The murderer is supposed to have followed the rhyme in committing the murders, but it seemed a stretch for me. There is an Inspector Neele assigned to the case, who I liked a lot. Of course, its really Jane Marple who solves the case.

Away From the Blog:

This past summer I read The Plainsong Trilogy. three novels by the late Kent Haruf set in eastern Colorado. I absolutely loved them. They really touched my heart and I wanted more. I went in search of more and found Our Souls At Night. For some reason it didn’t grab me and I set it aside. Then this week I saw a film by the same name on Netflix. It turned out to be the same story. I was still sceptical as it starred Robert Redford and Jane Fonda. I thought they would be too Hollywood-ish to play eastern Coloradoans. I gave it 15 minutes and if I didn’t like it, I’d turn it off.

Surprise! I loved it. The two stars did an excellent job of fitting right into roles of Addie and Louis — two elderly people, both widowed. They’ve lived next door to each other for years, but barely know each other. Thing change when Addie asks Louis if he will come a sleep with her at night. It’s not about sex. She jusr gets lonely with no one to talk to at night. It’s such a sweet story that I’m going to go back and read the original. I strongly recommend this one.

That’s all for this week. Have a great week ahead, and Happy Reading.

 

Posted in Weekly Review | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

TLC Book Tour For Syl Tang

Disrobed: How Clothing Predicts Economic Cycles, Saves Lives, and Determines the Future

I know that as you read the title above, you  are probably surprised by the statement. I know I was. I was also intrigued and, once I started reading the book, I was very pleased and excited by what I was learning. This is a very smart book that kept me thinking and then talking to family and friends for a long time. Let me give you just a glimpse of the subject matter in this portion of the publisher’s blurb:

“This book takes an everyday item and considers it in a way that readers may not have previously thought possible. It tackles topics relevant to today, everything from fakes in the museums to farm-to-table eating, and answers questions about how we can anticipate and change our world in areas as far-reaching as the environment, politics, and the clash of civilizations occurring between countries. Much like other pop economics books have done before, the stories are easily retold in water-cooler style, allowing them to be thoughtfully considered, argued, and discussed.”

I think many of us are tired of being depressed about the future of our country and our world. Spending time with this author, thinking the way a futurist thinks, certainly perked up my spirits. She had me thinking about so many different aspects of our lives that she got me out of thinking about myself. Just to show you the variety of topics here, let me share a few of the chapter titles:

  • Bankers’ Wives Are Laundering Money
  • Not Shopping Could Save The Planet
  • Is Your Cotton Shirt Causing Starvation?
  • Burkinis And The Clash of Civilization

Reading and thinking about the future made me think of my children and grandchildren a lot. The future certainly belongs to them. Disrobed is already set as gifts for several family members at Christmas time. Its a no-brainer that my two teenaged granddaughters will love all the fashion talk, but seriously, I think one of them will use the subject of this book as a school project or term paper. It’s that good!

Thanks to the publisher for my copy of the book and to TLC Book Tours for allowing me to be a part of it all. To see other stops on the book tour, visit the schedule here: Syl Tang Book Tour Schedule

Purchase Links

Rowman & Littlefield†| Amazon | Barnes & Noble

About Syl Tang

Syl Tang†is CEO and founder of the 19-year old HipGuide Inc. A futurist, her focus is how and why we consume, with an eye towards world events such as natural disasters, geo-political clashes, and pandemics. She has written hundreds of articles on the confluence of world events and soft goods for the Financial Times, predicting and documenting trends such as the Apple watch and other smart wearables, lab-made diamonds, the Department of Defenseís funding of Afghan jewelry companies, the effects of global warming on South Sea pearls, and the unsolved murder of tanzanite speculator Campbell Bridges. Her brand consulting work focuses on helping companies including Diageo, Revlon and the State of Michigan. She is behind the launches of some of the most well-known beauty, beverage, automotive and urban development efforts including category changers such as frozen alcohol and mineral makeup. In addition to developing her site, in 1999 she created the first mobile lifestyle texting product in the market and predicted mobile couponing as it exists today. Her company HipGuide is a case study taught in universities around the world, from Dubai to Nova Scotia to Purdue, through a textbook series.

Find Syl on Twitter.

Posted in Book Tour | Tagged , | 2 Comments

Wondrous Words #416

WWWEvery week word-lovers post new words they’ve discovered while reading. It’s called Wondrous Words Wednesday and was created by Kathy at Bermuda Onion’s Weblog.

I found this word in Politico while reading about the various elections around the country.

vicennial: Like in past years, the vicennial ballot question has attracted odd coalitions of liberals and conservatives on both sides.

As you can guess from the sentence, a vicennial election is one that occurs every 20 years. I’d never heard of such a vote, but it’s part of New York state’s constitution.

_______________________________

That’s all for me this week. Don’t forget to visit Kathy for more Wondrous Words Wednesday.

Posted in Wondrous Words | 2 Comments

First Paragraph: Disrobed by Syl Tang

firstparagraphEvery Tuesday Diane at Bibliophile By the Sea shares the first paragraph of a book currently being read. Feel free to join the fun.

~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~~  ~

Today I’m highlighting a book I will be reviewing on Thursday for a book tour. This is an extremely interesting little book on “How clothing predicts economic cycles, saves lives, and determines the future.” Here’s how it begins:

 

What if I were to tell you that clothing trends predicted the 2016 election?

Right before the 2008 US presidential election, a tremendous number of clothing brands created “educational” clothing: Rebok did a T-shirt John Maeda on math algorithms. Emperial Natrion launched T-shirts related to history, depicting events and figures from the American Civil War, the French Revolution, and the Ottoman. The Ken and Dana presented jewelry citing landmark legal cases, such as the one behind women’s right to vote ad Roe v. Wade. When Barack Obama was elected, many said it was a return to intellectualism, the thru mph of a highly educated law professor over the folksy Everyman campaign of his opponent. Was the nation simply ready for a leader who prized intellect over out feelings.

Looking at those clothing themes prior to the election, it would certainly seem so.

What do you think? Would you keep reading?

Posted in First Paragraph | 6 Comments