We’re Having a Few Problems

I live in Windsor, California which is a few miles north of Santa Rosa where 1500 structures were burned down and many people died. There are still non-contained fires north and east of our town. Our homes are still standing, but we have been on “Evacuation Watch” since early Monday morning. We each have a suitcase of clothes and bags of medications and other important items packed in the vehicles. We can be on the road within minutes. And all the neighbors are watching out for each other.

The photo above was taken about 10 a.m. over the top of our neighbor’s house. That’s how thick with smoke our skies are.

It definitely has been an experience which is not yet over. The devastation in Santa Rosa included the tower for our TV and Internet service. At the same time all gas was turned off which means no hot water or cooking/baking, except for electrical appliances. And then this morning, the electricity went down – for about five hours. What are we doing? Using camping gear, playing board games. and reading. All of this is inconvenient for sure, but we are not complaining. Our property and lives are still in tact. We are very thankful.

I’m posting this while I still have a little window of time with the internet and/or electricity. Joyfully Retired will be quiet until things are back to normal. Don’t worry about us. We’re fine.

 

Posted in This and That | 5 Comments

Wondrous Words #413

WWWEvery week word-lovers post new words they’ve discovered while reading. It’s called Wondrous Words Wednesday and was created by Kathy at Bermuda Onion’s Weblog.

I was reading an article on Wikipedia about the author Rex Stout when I found this new-to-me word:

corpus: “The Nero Wolfe corpus was nominated Best Mystery Series of the Century . . .”

I should have know this from the context, but I looked it up. I learned that corpus means a collection of written texts, especially the entire works of a particular author or a body of writing on a particular subject.

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That’s all for me this week. Don’t forget to visit Kathy for more Wondrous Words Wednesday.

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First Paragraph: Trickster’s Point

firstparagraphEvery Tuesday Diane at Bibliophile By the Sea shares the first paragraph of a book currently being read. Feel free to join the fun.

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I’m on a William Kent Krueger/Cork O’Connor roll. So far this week I’ve read three of his novels in the series and I’m current reading “Trickster’s Point. Before you ask, the answer is yes, I really like this series.

 

PROLOGUE

The dying don’t easily become the dead.

Even with an arrow in his heart, Jubal Little took three hours to die. Politician that he was, most of that time he couldn’t stop talking. At first, he talked about the arrow. Not how it got there—he believed he knew the answer to that—but arguing with Cork over whether to try to pull it out or push it through. Corcoran O’Connor did neither.

What do you think?

Would you keep reading?

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My Week In Review

Hi everyone. Thanks for stopping by. This has been an extremely busy week, but I still managed to squeeze in one book. Louise Penny is one of the few authors I wait and wait for each year. I truly love her book series. This year’s book is Glass Houses.

Glass Houses still features Chief Inspector Armand Gamache, although now Gamache is Superintendent of all the Quebec Surete. He still lives in Three Pines with all my favorite residents. This year there are a couple of new-comers and, on one cold night in November, a very mysterious stranger stands outside the bistro just staring in at various residents. He’s dressed in a mask and a cape and says nothing. Who is he/she?  He makes everyone nervous. And then, he disappeared. Shortly after that a dead body was discovered in the church basement.

At the same time Gamache and his team are in a tremendous fight against unbearably evil adversaries in the criminal world. The story of the fight is intertwined with the murder trial connected to the body found in the church. The story went back and forth between the trial story, the happenings in Three Pines and this secret plan at the Surete. It’s the only part of the book that bothered me a bit. Not a big problem, but sometimes it was confusing to go back and forth. That is my only concern. Overall this is another wonderful mystery from one of the best authors in the genre. Her number of awards is huge, and well earned.

Away From the Blog: Our Trip To Southern California:

We had a terrific time driving down to the southern half of the state. We visited with family members and attended a beautiful wedding. I spent one day with my brother, who lives in North Hollywood, and another day with my sister, who lives in Anaheim. Then we spent Sunday at the Long Beach pier with the rest of the family, including all the nieces, nephews and the great nieces and nephews. They are all such good people. My mom and dad would be so proud.

On Saturday we attended the wedding of two special friends. The ceremony itself was especially meaningful as I expected it would be. The bride is a Presbyterian minister and her husband is also a very spiritual man, so as expected the affirmations and vows were beautifully written. The other part of this wedding I enjoyed was simply getting dressed up! We seldom do that anymore, but the invitation said “semi-formal” so we all stepped up and did our part. Aside from the bride and groom who were gorgeous, I thought the best dressed person at the wedding was my youngest grandchild seen here showing off his new bowtie. He’s holding it up so we are sure to see it! (So cute, but then I’m probably prejudiced.)

That’s it for me this week. Have a great week everybody. Happy Reading!

Posted in Weekly Review | Tagged , | 3 Comments

Wondrous Words #412

WWWEvery week word-lovers post new words they’ve discovered while reading. It’s called Wondrous Words Wednesday and was created by Kathy at Bermuda Onion’s Weblog.

While reading Hag-Seed by Margaret Atwood I came across this ancient and interesting word:

predation: “But every time she used it would she risk predation from the lustful Caliban?”

Predation (prəˈdāSH(ə)n) has the root word prey. It refers to the preying of one animal on another. In the context of this story it means the action of attacking or plundering: the old story of male predation and female vulnerability

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That’s all for me this week. Don’t forget to visit Kathy for more Wondrous Words Wednesday.

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First Paragraph: Glass Houses by Louise Penny

firstparagraphEvery Tuesday Diane at Bibliophile By the Sea shares the first paragraph of a book currently being read. Feel free to join the fun.

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I’m reading the newest book in one of my favorite authors, Louise Penny. Glass Houses is the thirteenth book in the series. I can honestly say I have enthusiastically enjoyed every one of them. Here’s how Glass Houses begins:

Chapter One

“State your name, please.”
“Armad Gamache.”
“And you are the head of the Surete du Quebec?”
“The Chief Superintendent, oui.”

Gamache sat upright on the wooden chair. It was hot. Sweltering, really, on this July morning. He could taste perspiration from his upper lip and it was only just ten o’clock. It was only just starting.

What do you think?

Would you keep reading?

Posted in First Paragraph | 5 Comments

My Week In Review

Hi there. Thanks for stopping by to check on my week. I’m actually on the road this long weekend. We left Thursday for a family friend’s wedding in southern California. We’re also going to do some special visiting with my brother and sister.

I spent the earlier part of this week with two amazing audio-books – each one unique.

The Trespasser by Tina French is the last book (so far) in the author’s Dublin Murder Squad. Each book is a great story, but also like a special trip to Dublin. The audio-books are superb because they are narrated in the most beautiful Irish brogue. It feels like I’m listening to this story right there in Dublin.

The “trespasser” in the story refers to a clue within this intricately plotted mystery. The disaster is a family – mom, dad and two children – are all dead in their home, with the exception of the mom who is barely alive. This is definitely a huge “whodunnit” because the detectives – and this reader – are forced to suspect every person in the story except the two little children. Tana French is truly an excellent writer, not just a great mystery writer. She’s well worth reading, even if you’re not a mystery fan.

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I also listened to The Home Front, an excellent audio history of the culture of World War II. It’s an original production by Audible in which they brilliantly used the oral histories from places like the Library of Congress, the World War II Museum and the Rosie the Riveter project. I loved hearing the voices with a variety of accents of the people who lived, worked, and fought during this time period. I also thought the narrator, Martin Sheen, did an excellent job.

I actually shouldn’t call this a “book” since there is no paper or electronic version of The Home Front. It is currently FREE on Audible until mid-November. The Home Front ran a little over 8 hours. You’ll be glad you listened.

That’s it for me this week. I hope you’ve had a great week too. Happy Reading.

Posted in Weekly Review | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Wondrous Words #411

WWWEvery week I join Kathy at Bermuda Onion’s Weblog to post about new words we’ve discovered. It’s called Wondrous Words Wednesday.

Last week the leader of North Korea used a new-to-everybody word. He had everyone hustling to their dictionaries to understand a word he used in an international statement. Reports say the word overloaded online dictionary websites. Here’s the word:

dotard: “I will surely and definitely tame the mentally deranged U.S. dotard with fire,” said North Korea’s Kim Jong Un. (Issued on Thursday, September 21)

Dotard means an old person, especially one who has become weak or senile.

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That’s all for me this week. Don’t forget to visit Kathy for more Wondrous Words Wednesday.

Posted in Wondrous Words | 2 Comments

First Paragraph: The Trespasser

firstparagraphEvery Tuesday Diane at Bibliophile By the Sea shares the first paragraph of a book currently being read. Feel free to join the fun.

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I’m reading/listening to the sixth book in Tana French’s Dublin Murder Squad series. This is the last one — so far. I’ve loved every book in this Irish mystery series. I do hope Ms. French keeps going. Here’s how the book begins:

 

My ma used to tell me stories about my da. The first one OI remember, he was an Egyptian prince who wanted to marry her and stay in Ireland foreveer, only his family made him go home to marry an Arabian princess.

What do you think?

Would you keep reading?

Posted in First Paragraph | 8 Comments