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Hi! My name is Margot. My blog is about the things I love to do. That could be what I'm reading, places we visit, my family, food, or whatever else is happening. I hope you'll stay and visit a while. Contact me by email: joyfullyretired (at) gmail (dot) com.

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Wondrous Words #297

WWWEvery week word-lovers post new words they’ve discovered while reading. It’s called Wondrous Words Wednesday and was created by Kathy at Bermuda Onion’s Weblog.

I have a couple of words from The Resilient Investor, a book my son co-wrote with his business partners.

1.  proferred:  Are the recommendations proffered by traditional investment books, magazines, and financial services firms the one and only valid methodology?

Proffered in this sentence is a verb meaning to hold out (something) to someone for acceptance. It is an offer: he proffered his resignation. Profer can also be a noun in a literary sense. In this case it means an offer or proposal.

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2.  Anthropocene: The lens of resilience makes us more cognizant that for better or worse we have entered the age of the Anthropocene—a new term for a geological age in which humans have become the dominant factor shaping the world.

Okay, that’s it for me this week. I hope you found some words worth celebrating.

First Paragraph: The Bone Tree

This week’s featured book is The Bone Tree by Greg Iles. This is the author’s second book in a trilogy set in Natchez, Mississippi. It features Penn Cage, a character who has been in a couple of Iles’ previous books. The books are long but soon good. Here’s how the book begins:

Bone TreeTonight death and time showed me their true faces. We spend our lives plodding blindly through the slaughterhouse gate between past and future. Every second is annihilation: the death of this moment, the birth of this moment. There is no “next” moment. There is only now.

What do you think?
Would you keep going?

Every Tuesday Diane at Bibliophile By the Sea asks us to share the first paragraph of a book we are reading. As you can see it’s called First Chapter, First Paragraph Tuesday Intros. Visit Diane to read more First Paragraphs.

firstparagraph

My Brilliant Son’s Brilliant Book: The Resilient Investor: A Plan for Your Life, Not Just Your Money

I have found it hard to be objective when talking about my children. As much as I try, I can’t help but see them as good-looking, socially well-adjusted, brilliant, and so on. And now, here I am with a copy of my son’s recently published book, and I’m trying to write an objective review. Again — it’s impossible, because, of course, the book is Brilliant! I know, telling you that it’s Brilliant doesn’t help you understand. I think a better strategy is to simply tell you what the book is about.

Resiliant InvestorThe Resilient Investor was created as a guidebook for people who consciously think about what they are doing with their lives and their money. As the subtitle says, “A Plan for Your Life, Not Just Your Money.” The authors believe investing is not just about having more. Its about living a happy, fulfilling life. The book begins by reminding us of Aristotle who . . .

“ . . . described the point of a well-lived life, the goal we should be aiming for, as “blessedness.” For Aristotle blessedness meant enjoying family and friends, with a deep feeling of well-being and contentment.”

Our lives are about more than accumulating wealth. Do our investments of money and time reflect the values that are important to us? Do they lead to that state of blessedness?

The Resilient Investor offers an excellent tool to help readers examine our “blessedness.” It’s a nine-zoned chart or map called the Resilient Investor Map. (See below) The map is divided into the various aspects of our lives and our investments. On one side of the map is the three types of assets/returns: Financial, Tangible and Personal. Dividing the map across the top are the three core investment strategies: Close to Home, Sustainable Global Economy and Evolutionary. Each zone of the map is thoroughly explained and discussed through out the book.

The Resilient Investor Map (RIM)

RIM

As you read The Resilient Investor, you’ll want to examine your own life. Good news: the authors do not leave you alone. The book is meant to be interactive and to continue past the last page. A website, Resilient Investor, has been created with that in mind. There you will find a blank copy of the Resilient Investor Map. You can copy it to design and implement your own personal plan. In addition, the website links to the Resilient Investor blog with even more updated information.

As I read and worked my way through The Resilient Investor, I found myself thinking about the future. How prepared am I? Am I resilient in light of the various things that might happen? What strategies will I adopt? Like me, you may find that reading this book will make you change the way you think about investing and the future. And, that can be a very good thing.

Wow! Did I tell you the book is Brilliant?!

Wondrous Words #296

WWWEvery week word-lovers post new words they’ve discovered while reading. It’s called Wondrous Words Wednesday and was created by Kathy at Bermuda Onion’s Weblog.

Yesterday I finished read The Resilient Investor, a book written by my son and his two business partners/friends. I know you expect me to say  “Its brilliant!” so, of course, I won’t disappoint you. It is!

I’m going to tell you all about the book either tomorrow or Friday. One of the nice things, for those of us who call ourselves WORD LOVERS, is that there are some nice new words in the book.

Here’s one that grabbed me right away in the second paragraph:

prescient: “We would also wager that you would love to have a crystal ball that could tell you how the future will unfold, enabling you to make prescient decisions as you glide through life.”

Presient is an adjective and it means having or showing knowledge of events before they take place – a skill we would all love to have.

I’ll share more new words from the book next week. In the meantime, don’t forget to visit Kathy @ Bermuda Onion’s Weblog.

 

Okay, that’s it for me this week. I hope you found some words worth celebrating.

First Paragraph: Losing Faith

I’m reading a book in one of my favorite genres: legal thrillers. This is my first time reading a thriller by Adam Mitzner, but I can tell you his Losing Faith is already very, very good. Here’s how the book begins:

Losing Faith

“You’re wrong, Aaron.”

Sam Rosenthal’s tone suggests he’s talking about much more than the topic at hand. It’s as if he’s addressing something innate about Aaron Littman himself.

Aaron smiles, and in that gesture, he belies Rosenthal’s claim. In fact, if anyone seems completely right, it is Aaron Littman. A year past fifty, he’s six foot two and not more than ten pounds heavier than when he was an All-American swimmer at Harvard. A strong jaw, piercing blue eyes, and thick, jet-black hair dusted with gray around the temples in exactly the spots you’d place gray hairs, if given the choie, complete the packag

What do you think?
Would you keep going?

Every Tuesday Diane at Bibliophile By the Sea asks us to share the first paragraph of a book we are reading. As you can see it’s called First Chapter, First Paragraph Tuesday Intros. Visit Diane to read more First Paragraphs.

firstparagraph

Book Review: The View From Here

View From Here.

Author: Cindy Myers

Publisher: Kensington, 2012

Genre: Literary Fiction

Maggie was a recently divorced woman living in Houston. The divorce was not Maggie’s idea, but her ex-husband was such a jerk that I think she should be off somewhere rejoicing. But instead, as often happens with some women, Maggie felt that, somehow, she had failed.

And then — a letter arrived from an attorney in a small town in Colorado. It told her she had inherited, from her long absent father, a piece of land on the top of a mountain with a cabin and a gold mine. Even with that good news, Maggie had to be forced by her best friend to leave Houston.

The residents of the small mining town of Eureka opened their arms to welcome Maggie. Well, almost all residents. The local librarian had a problem with Maggie’s father and took it out on Maggie. But Maggie learns the librarian was the exception; everyone else loved him. Since Maggie never knew her father, this time in his home and town helped Maggie. It was good for Maggie to better understand he past and herself.

This was a very good story. In addition to what I’ve outlined, there were times of good humor, examples of true friendship, a possible romance, a teenager looking for a steady home, and more. Read The View From Here for an inside visit to small town Colorado.

The Latest Look at Harry Bosch

Burning Room 2.

I like whatever Michael Connelly writes. I’m particularly fond of his Lincoln Lawyer series, but I also enjoy the Harry Bosch series. The Burning Room is the 19th book in the series. You would think the author would run out plot ideas by now, but you would be wrong.

Harry has been working cold cases for several years now and, of course, he’s very good at it. What is new is that he has a new partner, Lucia Soto. She’s a rookie detective, a hero-with-baggage, and Harry is asked to mentor her.

The case that is at the center of their lives is unusual. Nine years ago a stray bullet entered the spine of a member of a local mariachi band. The man just now died as a result of that bullet and Harry and Lucia are asked to overlook the case.

As the detectives take a cursory look at the circumstances of the shooting, enough red flags are raised to make them believe the shooting was not necessarily random. They are calling it murder and, it could have connections to the former mayor now running for governor. The fact that all the leads are cold doesn’t stop the detectives nor the political sensitivity of the police bosses.

BoschHarry is an interesting character. There is a lot of depth to him and he’s smart. In addition, he is very thorough with every piece of evidence. He does have an edge to him. He distrusts all politicians and almost everyone who holds a high rank in the police department. Watching his mind work through all the clues was and amazing experience.

Harry has been elevated to stardom in Amazon’s Prime TV series program. One season of ten episodes is available for viewing with promises of more. Harry is played beautifully by Titus Welliver. They have taken a little literary license with Harry by making him younger. Rather than having fought in Vietnam, he’s shown as a veteran of Desert Storm. He’s not a part of the cold-case unit. He’s on the streets and in lots of action. If you have Amazon Prime and a fan of Harry Bosch, this is well worth checking out.

Thanks to my local library I read this book via audiobook. It was a special treat as jt was read by the Bosch actor Titus Welliver. Perfect.

Published by Little, Brown and Company November 2014

Wondrous Words #295

WWWEvery week word-lovers post new words they’ve discovered while reading. It’s called Wondrous Words Wednesday and was created by Kathy at Bermuda Onion’s Weblog.

This week I only found one new-to-me word. I found it while reading a New York Times’ report about how the drought is affecting California.

untrammeled: A punishing drought is forcing a reconsideration of whether the aspiration of untrammeled growth that has for so long been the state’s engine has run against the limits of nature.

I should have known this one, but I didn’t. Untrammeled is an adjective meaning not deprived of freedom of action or expression; not restricted or hampered. The second definition applies here.

Okay, that’s it for me this week. I hope you found some words worth celebrating.

First Paragraph: The View From Here

I just finished reading The View From Here by XX. It was one of those fun, comfort-reads. I’ll tell you about it on Thursday. In the meantime, here’s how the story begins:

View From Here“Open it. What are you afraid of?”

A simple question, with lots of simple answers. Maggie Stevens was afrai of heights. Of snakes, deep water, dentistry, and needles. She was afraid of being stuck on a plane next to a guy who wouldn’t shut up, of suddenly becoming allergic to chocolate and of getting old and losing her butt.

And, apparently, of thick envelopes with the return address of law firms. She stood in the living room of the house in Houston where she’d lived for twenty years, her best friend, Barbara Stanowski, at her side. Sunlight poured through the curtain less windows, so that Maggie had to squint to read the embossed print on the heavy linen envelope: REGINALD PAXTON, EDQUITR, 113 FOURTTH STREET, EUREKA, COLORADO.

What do you think?
Would you keep going?

Every Tuesday Diane at Bibliophile By the Sea asks us to share the first paragraph of a book we are reading. As you can see it’s called First Chapter, First Paragraph Tuesday Intros. Visit Diane to read more First Paragraphs.

firstparagraph

Book Review: The Godforsaken Daughter

Godforsaken DaughterAuthor: Christina McKenna

Publisher: Lake Union Publishing, March 17, 2015

Genre: Literary Fiction

I agreed to read and participate in the TLC Book Tour for this book as I was reading Maeve Binchy’s A Week In Winter. I loved the whole feel of Ireland and the rural Irish people I met in that novel. I wanted more of Ireland!

The Godforsaken Dauhter certainly gave me that. There are differences, of course. but primarily what makes me love these Irish books is how the people talk, think, treat each other, and look at the world.

In The Godforsaken Daughter the story revolves around Ruby Clare, a young woman living on a farm in Northern Ireland. Ruby actually loves dairy farming — caring for the animals and the land. She has worked side-by-side with her father all her life, but now, since her father’s death, all of that is gone. Her very nasty and spiteful mother sold all the cows and has rented out the pasture land to other farmers. Ruby is grieving from all of it.

One day, while cleaning in the attic, Ruby discovers an old suitcase that belonged to her grandmother. In it she finds tarot cards, a book called The Book of Light, and other items which would suggest her grandmother practiced witchcraft.

The contents in the suitcase give Ruby hope that, if she tries some of these things, she might be able to achieve her dreams. She figures its worth a try. When Ruby attempts to do a Summer Solstice celebration, everything comes to a head. Ruby’s mother is so outraged that she calls a psychiatrist, Henry Shevlin, to have Ruby committed to an insane asylum.

Henry is able to quickly sum up the situation in a calm professional manner. He manages to help Ruby, while at the same time, he mollifies her mother. As Ruby comes to the psychiatrist’s clinic on a regular basis, she begins to meet other people who become friends. In particular, I loved Rose, a woman who has great respect for all people. She also considers herself a skilled matchmaker. She soon has someone in mind for Ruby.

I also liked the character of Henry, the psychiatrist. He’s an extremely good and competent psychiatristm but we also learn that Henry has serious personal problems. His wife has disappeared with no clues or any sort of explanation. This whole part of the story is an excellent story within a story. Spoiler Alert: It has something to do with the IRA in Northern Ireland in the 1980s.

This is a complex story with characters who have real depth. To me these were real people with real problems. I love to love good characters, but I also love to hate real bad characters. I certainly got that in The Godforsaken Daughter. I don’t believe I can explain how horrible Ruby’s mother was. She was rude, nasty, hateful, domineering, and downright verbally abusive to her oldest daughter who she treated like a slave. You do not want to miss meeting this monster mother.

I first read this novel on my Kindle via my advanced reading copy. When I saw it advertised on Audible, I immediately downloaded it. The narrator, Sue Pitkin, really enhanced my enjoyment of this book. She made Ruby’s mother even nastier than she was in my head. Her interpretation of Ruby and Rose made them seem even more quirky and lovable than in the print version. I strongly recommend reading this book via audio.

Thanks to the publisher for my copy of the book and to TLC Book Tours for allowing me to be a part of it all. To see other stops on the book tour, visit the schedule here: TLC Book Tours