First Paragraph: All the Ugly and Wonderful Things

Every Tuesday Vicki at I’d Rather Be At the Beach shares the first paragraph of a book currently being read. Feel free to join the fun.

~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~~  ~

Although this story features a young girl with very negligent parents, so many of my bookish friends gave this book very high praise. So I’m starting it this week. Here’s the beginning:

 

All the Ugly
PART ONE

: 
AMY
March 1975

My mother always started the story by saying, “Well, she was born in the backseat of a stranger’s car,” as though that explained why Wavy wasn’t normal. It seemed to me that could happen to anybody. Maybe on the way to the hospital, your parents’ respectable, middle-class car broke own. That was not what happened to Wavy. She was born in the backseat of a stranger’s car, because Uncle Liam and Aunt Val were homeless, driving through Texas when their old beat-up va broke down. Nine months pregnant, Aunt Val hitchhiked to the next town for help. If you ever consider playing Good Samaritan to a pregnant woman, think about cleaning that up.

What do you think?

Would you keep reading?

Posted in First Paragraph | 5 Comments

A Look At My Week

Hi everyone. It’s nice to be back home again after a few weeks off for family holiday time. Except for an all-family cough/cold, we had a super time. It was so good to see how those two beautiful granddaughters are blossoming. Our youngest member, four-year-old TJ, called the trip his “Portland Adventure.” We enjoyed comparing our Santa Rosa Children’s Museum with Portland’s, but the best spot for him was the real submarine at Portland’s Science Museum. A nice touch was the snow on the ground for Christmas day.

I have to confess: I did not read a lot while I was gone. I was so excited about getting Prairie Fires by Caroline Fraser, the “real” story behind the Little House book. However, within a few chapters I gave up. It was so negative that I didn’t want to ruin my holiday. I’ll come back to it in a month or so. I did read a couple of books for upcoming book club meetings, but I’ll share that with you next week.

Today let me share my list of reading challenges I’ll work on this year.

My GoodReads Challenges

Goal: 104 books

Angel's Guilty Pleasures

Library Love Challenge

Hosted by Angel’s Guilty Pleasure

Goal: Library Addict Level: 48+ books

*Neew this year: Monthly Motif Challenge

Hosted by Girlxo 

Goal: 12 books

Foodies Read

Hoted at Based On a True Story

Goal: 6 books

What’s In A Name? (A perennial favorite-my 8th year)

Hosted by The Worm’s Hole

  • The word ‘the’ used twice
  • A fruit or vegetable
  • A shape
  • A title that begins with Z – can be after ‘The’ or ‘A’
  • A nationality
  • A season

Goal: All 6

NonFiction Challenge

Hosted by Doing Dewey

Goal: 20% of books read will be nonfiction

~   ~   ~   ~   ~   ~   ~   ~   ~   ~   ~   ~   ~

What I’m Watching  .  .  .  Well, Going To Watch:

My twelve-year-old granddaughter, Lou, wrote out a list of movies she believes I will love. We tend to like the same things so I trust her judgement. I have the first two already coming from the library. The both feature twelve-year-olds – Lou’s age. Did I mention Lou is taking Drama this year? They just finished Romeo and Juliet. Have you seen any of these movies?

Stand By Me

Now and Then

Collaterial Beauty

The Truman Show      

That’s it for me this week. Hope  you don’t mind my “listing” post. Now it’s time to get on woth some serious reading if I’m going to meet all my challenges. Happy Reading to you too.

Posted in Book Challenges, Weekly Review | 5 Comments

Happy New Year

happy-new-year-1

Posted in This and That | 3 Comments

Merry Christmas

Wishing you and  your family

a warm and happy Christmas

filled with love, laughter, good food, and

 

Posted in This and That | 2 Comments

Wondrous Words #422

WWWEvery week word-lovers post new words they’ve discovered while reading. It’s called Wondrous Words Wednesday and was created by Kathy at Bermuda Onion’s Weblog.

This new-to-me word came from Norwegian by Night by Derek B. Miller

karbonade: There is a half-eaten karbonade sandwich that he doesn’t like on the paper plate cradled in his lap.

My dictionary did not have this word, but online I found it in the bab.la  Norwegian-English translation. Believe it or not, a carbonade is a hamburger.

~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~

That’s all for me this week. I’m leaving today for Portland for our family’s holiday celebration. I’ll check in from time to time in the next few weeks, but I won’t be back to regular posting until sometime in January.

Posted in Wondrous Words | 2 Comments

First Paragraph: Prarie Fires

firstparagraphEvery Tuesday Diane at Bibliophile By the Sea shares the first paragraph of a book currently being read. Feel free to join the fun.

~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~~  ~

I am very excited about reading this book. I read the whole series of Lara Ingalls Wilder’s Little House books and read them to my children. I had lots of questions about various aspects of the life on the prairie as I read the books. Now this book, Prairie Fires: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder by Caroline Fraser, brings us a look at the whole life of Laura. Here’s how the story begins:

 

Introduction

On a spring day in April of 1924, Laura Ingalls Wilder, a fifty-seven-year-old farm wife in the Missouri Ozarks, received a telegram from South Dakota. Her mother, Caroline Ingalls, had just died. Wilder hadn’t seen her for more than twenty years.

A few weeks later, still reeling, she wrote a brief note to be published in place of her regular column in a farm newspaper. Every woman in the world who has lost her mother will recognize the retrospective shadow of sorrow, regret, and crippling nostalgia that the news cast across her life. “Some of us have received such messages,” she said flatly. “Those who have not, one day will.

 

What do you think?

Would you keep reading?

Posted in First Paragraph | 4 Comments

My Favorite Books of 2017

ItsAWrap It’s always fun to go back and pick out the books I’ve enjoyed the most this past year. Before I present my list, there are a couple of things I should mention first. Only a few of my favorite books were published in 2017 and nearly half of the books I read came from the library. This means my list will not look anything like what  you’ll find in the New York Times Top Books of the Year or other published lists. This is simply a look at the books I loved. It started out much larger, but I made myself limit the list to 10. And, here they are:

Fiction:

Hag-Seed by Margaret Atwood
Plainsong by Kent Haruf
Americabah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
The Last Bus To Wisdom by Ivan Doig

Mystery:

Glass Houses by Louise Penny
The Secret Place by Tana French
In Farleigh Field by Rhys Bowen
The Late Show by Michael Connelly

NonFiction:

Hillbilly Elegy by J.D. Vance

And the Absolute Number One Best Book of the Year:

A Gentleman In Moscow by Amor Towles

What is your favorite book of he year?

Posted in My Favorite Reads, This and That | 4 Comments

Wondrous Words #421

WWWEvery week word-lovers post new words they’ve discovered while reading. It’s called Wondrous Words Wednesday and was created by Kathy at Bermuda Onion’s Weblog.

I found this word while reading a review for the book Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein:

encomium:  “I knew there had to be a reason for all the encomiums so I kept going, and was richly rewarded for it.

Encomium means a speech or piece of writing that praises someone or something highly.

~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~

That’s all for me this week. Don’t forget to visit Kathy for more Wondrous Words Wednesday.

Posted in Wondrous Words | 2 Comments

First Paragraph: Miss Jane

firstparagraphEvery Tuesday Diane at Bibliophile By the Sea shares the first paragraph of a book currently being read. Feel free to join the fun.

~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~~  ~

I’m reading Miss Jane by Brad Watson for an upcoming book club discussion. It’s historical fiction based in part on the real life of one of the author’s relatives. So far i am thoroughly enjoying this one. Here’s how it begins:

You would not think someone so afflicted would or could be cheerful, not prone to melancholy or the miseries. Early on she acquired ways of dealing with her life, with life in general. And as she grew older it became evident that she feared almost nothing—perhaps only horses and something she couldn’t quite name, a strange presence of danger not quite or not really a part of the world.

What do you think? Would you keep reading?

Posted in First Paragraph | 6 Comments