My Week In Review

Hi everyone. Thanks for stopping by. This has been an extremely busy week, but I still managed to squeeze in one book. Louise Penny is one of the few authors I wait and wait for each year. I truly love her book series. This year’s book is Glass Houses.

Glass Houses still features Chief Inspector Armand Gamache, although now Gamache is Superintendent of all the Quebec Surete. He still lives in Three Pines with all my favorite residents. This year there are a couple of new-comers and, on one cold night in November, a very mysterious stranger stands outside the bistro just staring in at various residents. He’s dressed in a mask and a cape and says nothing. Who is he/she?  He makes everyone nervous. And then, he disappeared. Shortly after that a dead body was discovered in the church basement.

At the same time Gamache and his team are in a tremendous fight against unbearably evil adversaries in the criminal world. The story of the fight is intertwined with the murder trial connected to the body found in the church. The story went back and forth between the trial story, the happenings in Three Pines and this secret plan at the Surete. It’s the only part of the book that bothered me a bit. Not a big problem, but sometimes it was confusing to go back and forth. That is my only concern. Overall this is another wonderful mystery from one of the best authors in the genre. Her number of awards is huge, and well earned.

Away From the Blog: Our Trip To Southern California:

We had a terrific time driving down to the southern half of the state. We visited with family members and attended a beautiful wedding. I spent one day with my brother, who lives in North Hollywood, and another day with my sister, who lives in Anaheim. Then we spent Sunday at the Long Beach pier with the rest of the family, including all the nieces, nephews and the great nieces and nephews. They are all such good people. My mom and dad would be so proud.

On Saturday we attended the wedding of two special friends. The ceremony itself was especially meaningful as I expected it would be. The bride is a Presbyterian minister and her husband is also a very spiritual man, so as expected the affirmations and vows were beautifully written. The other part of this wedding I enjoyed was simply getting dressed up! We seldom do that anymore, but the invitation said “semi-formal” so we all stepped up and did our part. Aside from the bride and groom who were gorgeous, I thought the best dressed person at the wedding was my youngest grandchild seen here showing off his new bowtie. He’s holding it up so we are sure to see it! (So cute, but then I’m probably prejudiced.)

That’s it for me this week. Have a great week everybody. Happy Reading!

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Wondrous Words #412

WWWEvery week word-lovers post new words they’ve discovered while reading. It’s called Wondrous Words Wednesday and was created by Kathy at Bermuda Onion’s Weblog.

While reading Hag-Seed by Margaret Atwood I came across this ancient and interesting word:

predation: “But every time she used it would she risk predation from the lustful Caliban?”

Predation (prəˈdāSH(ə)n) has the root word prey. It refers to the preying of one animal on another. In the context of this story it means the action of attacking or plundering: the old story of male predation and female vulnerability

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That’s all for me this week. Don’t forget to visit Kathy for more Wondrous Words Wednesday.

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First Paragraph: Glass Houses by Louise Penny

firstparagraphEvery Tuesday Diane at Bibliophile By the Sea shares the first paragraph of a book currently being read. Feel free to join the fun.

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I’m reading the newest book in one of my favorite authors, Louise Penny. Glass Houses is the thirteenth book in the series. I can honestly say I have enthusiastically enjoyed every one of them. Here’s how Glass Houses begins:

Chapter One

“State your name, please.”
“Armad Gamache.”
“And you are the head of the Surete du Quebec?”
“The Chief Superintendent, oui.”

Gamache sat upright on the wooden chair. It was hot. Sweltering, really, on this July morning. He could taste perspiration from his upper lip and it was only just ten o’clock. It was only just starting.

What do you think?

Would you keep reading?

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My Week In Review

Hi there. Thanks for stopping by to check on my week. I’m actually on the road this long weekend. We left Thursday for a family friend’s wedding in southern California. We’re also going to do some special visiting with my brother and sister.

I spent the earlier part of this week with two amazing audio-books – each one unique.

The Trespasser by Tina French is the last book (so far) in the author’s Dublin Murder Squad. Each book is a great story, but also like a special trip to Dublin. The audio-books are superb because they are narrated in the most beautiful Irish brogue. It feels like I’m listening to this story right there in Dublin.

The “trespasser” in the story refers to a clue within this intricately plotted mystery. The disaster is a family – mom, dad and two children – are all dead in their home, with the exception of the mom who is barely alive. This is definitely a huge “whodunnit” because the detectives – and this reader – are forced to suspect every person in the story except the two little children. Tana French is truly an excellent writer, not just a great mystery writer. She’s well worth reading, even if you’re not a mystery fan.

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I also listened to The Home Front, an excellent audio history of the culture of World War II. It’s an original production by Audible in which they brilliantly used the oral histories from places like the Library of Congress, the World War II Museum and the Rosie the Riveter project. I loved hearing the voices with a variety of accents of the people who lived, worked, and fought during this time period. I also thought the narrator, Martin Sheen, did an excellent job.

I actually shouldn’t call this a “book” since there is no paper or electronic version of The Home Front. It is currently FREE on Audible until mid-November. The Home Front ran a little over 8 hours. You’ll be glad you listened.

That’s it for me this week. I hope you’ve had a great week too. Happy Reading.

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Wondrous Words #411

WWWEvery week I join Kathy at Bermuda Onion’s Weblog to post about new words we’ve discovered. It’s called Wondrous Words Wednesday.

Last week the leader of North Korea used a new-to-everybody word. He had everyone hustling to their dictionaries to understand a word he used in an international statement. Reports say the word overloaded online dictionary websites. Here’s the word:

dotard: “I will surely and definitely tame the mentally deranged U.S. dotard with fire,” said North Korea’s Kim Jong Un. (Issued on Thursday, September 21)

Dotard means an old person, especially one who has become weak or senile.

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That’s all for me this week. Don’t forget to visit Kathy for more Wondrous Words Wednesday.

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First Paragraph: The Trespasser

firstparagraphEvery Tuesday Diane at Bibliophile By the Sea shares the first paragraph of a book currently being read. Feel free to join the fun.

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I’m reading/listening to the sixth book in Tana French’s Dublin Murder Squad series. This is the last one — so far. I’ve loved every book in this Irish mystery series. I do hope Ms. French keeps going. Here’s how the book begins:

 

My ma used to tell me stories about my da. The first one OI remember, he was an Egyptian prince who wanted to marry her and stay in Ireland foreveer, only his family made him go home to marry an Arabian princess.

What do you think?

Would you keep reading?

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My Week In Review

 

This week has been one of what some people might call pure indulgence. I only read books and watched tv, youtube and netflix shows. I’ve had a slight medical problem so I’ve not been able to move around much. I’m okay, it’s not a big deal, but it was fun to spend the whole week having fun.

This week I started listening to a set of three books – episodes – novellas (not sure what to call them) that were one of Audible’s “Daily Deals.” Cherringham was written by the team of Matthew Costello and Neil Richards. They’ve collaborated quite a bit on books, TV series, video games and so forth. Cherringham was meant to be read as an episode-at-a-time series, much like Charles Dickens’ work. They are a crime/mystery series. They are light, but not cute cozies – even though that’s what they call them. It was easy to be caught up in them.

Cherringham is a quiet English vilage where Jack, a former New York detective has gone to retire and fish. It’s also where Sarah, a divorced mom and web designer has retreated to. Its not that village life is dull, but they are both smart, logical, tenacious, and with good people skills. When unusual and mysterious things happen, they can’t help but do a little sleuthing.

In the first three episodes I read we first meet Sarah who does not believe what the police say is the cause of death for her friend. She asks Jack to help her. The second episode was a great thought-bender. Why did an old man die up in the attic, how did he get there, who set the deadly fire, and which of the three evil siblings is the most evil? The third episorde involves the death of a young woman due to her peanut allergy. Why didn’t her epi-pen work? I thoroughly enjoyed these three episodes. Lucky for me there are nine more compilations or 24 books-novellas-episodes.

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It’s always a super-treat to read a book by Michael Connelly. They always capture my imagination. This week it was extra special because I read his first book in a new series: The Late Show. In this new series Mr. Connelly is featuring a female detective, Renée Ballard, usually just called Ballard.

I like Renée’s basic character – a hard-working, determined detective who has principles about treating everyone right. Renée has been stuck on the worst shift, the graveyard shift, but what everybody on the force calls the “late show.” It took me quite a while to figure out why Renée was forced to work the “late show.” She doesn’t complain about it, but it bothers her because she seldom gets to see a case through to completion. Renée and her partner must turn over every new case they get to the day shift. “She’s a detective,” she says. “I want to follow leads and detect.”

One night Renée she gets a case that day shift doesn’t seem to care about because there’s a bigger case they’r working on. It’s Renée chance, but still she works on it on her own time until – that is – someone discovers that her case is overlapping with a much bigger case. Then she’s out of luck. But, did I tell you Renée is persistent? I won’t spoil the story for you except to say this one is worth reading.

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Away From the Blog:

I’m watching food shows, specifically Food Network’s key shows. One I’ve enjoyed is Guy Fieri’s Family Trip. The Fieris live in the next town over from us, has restaurants around us, so he feels like a local. On this trip he took his wife and two boys in a RV from his home and across the southern part of the country. They made special stops that involve food. One of my favorites was a place that makes donuts, a favorite food of Guy’s youngest son. In addition to the food they saw some amazing sights. My husband and I traveled in our RV to several of those places too. It brought back great memories.

I’ve also been watching The Great Food Truck Race. The race started with seven teams. Each week the teams go to a different town, with special challenges and attempt to be the ones whose food truck has the highest sales. It’s an interesting look at a basic food-related business. Tonight’s episode is the final one of this season. I like both teams so I’ll be happy to have either one win.

 

That’s it for me this week. I hope you’ve had a great week too. Happy Reading.

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Wondrous Words #410

content/uploads/2014/06/WWW.png” alt=”WWW” width=”191″ height=”164″ />Every week I join Kathy at Bermuda Onion’s Weblog to post about new words we’ve discovered. It’s called Wondrous Words Wednesday.

I found this word in a Politico story about Obama’s post-presidency:

absolutism: “Obama was cautioning against absolutism and self-assurance.”

Absolutism is a noun meaning the acceptance of or belief in absolute principles in political, philosophical, ethical, or theological matters.

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This word was heard on national television:

mendaciousness:  “I was skeptical of what he said given his history of mendaciousness.”

Mendacious means not telling the truth.

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That’s all for me this week. Don’t forget to visit Kathy for more Wondrous Words Wednesday.

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First Paragraph: The Late Show

firstparagraphEvery Tuesday Diane at Bibliophile By the Sea shares the first paragraph of a book currently being read. Feel free to join the fun.

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I am a big fan of Michael Connelly. Have been for a long time. I like both his Harry Bosch series and his Mickey Haller series. Well, now Mr. Connelly has introduced a new star and, I hope, a new series. This new “star” is Renée Ballard. She’s a young detective working the midnight-to-dawn shift in L.A. She’s sharp and dedicated and should be moving ahead, but an influential lieutenant has it in for her. So far I’m really enjoying getting to know Renée. Here’s how the story begins:

 

Ballard and Jenkins rolled up on the house on El Centro shortly before midnight. It was the first call of the shift. There was already a patrol cruiser at the curb out front and Ballard recognized the two blue suiters standing on the front porch of the bungalow with a gray-haired woman in a bathrobe. John Stanley was the shift’s senior lead officer—the street boss—and his partner was Jaco Ross.

What do you think?

Would you keep reading?

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