Wondrous Words #383

WWWEvery week word-lovers post new words they’ve discovered while reading. It’s called Wondrous Words Wednesday and was created by Kathy at Bermuda Onion’s Weblog.

I found two words in one of the daily newsletters I get from the Opinion section of the NY Times.

  1. theocracy: “The attempts will fail only if Americans work to defeat the White House’s flirtations with theocracy — as so many people began to do this weekend.”

Theocracy (THēˈäkrəsē) is a system of government in which priests rule in the name of God or a god.

2. quiescent: “ . . . stood beside Trump, clapping and nodding as he signed the executive order (while Paul Ryan and other top Republicans were largely quiescent).”

I thought quiescent equaled quiet, but it doesn’t. Quiescent (kwēˈesnt) is an adjective meaning in a state or period of inactivity or dormancy.

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That’s it for me this week. I hope you found some words worth celebrating. Feel free to join Wondrous Words Wednesday. Be sure to visit Kathy for the details.

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What Am I Reading? Wilde Lake by Laura Lippman

This week I’m featuring a book I’m reading for an upcoming book tour. So far I’m thoroughly enjoying the details and intricacies of the characters and the plot of this family and small community story. Here’s how it begins:

 

Part One

When my brother was eighteen, he broke his arm in an accident that ended in another young man’s death. I wish I could tell you that we mourned the boy who died, but we did not. He was the one with murder in his heart and, sure enough, death found him that night. Funny how that works.

 

What do you think?

Would you keep reading?

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firstparagraphEvery Tuesday Diane at Bibliophile By the Sea shares the first paragraph of a book currently being read. Feel free to join the fun.

 

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My Week . . .

Hi everyone! I hope you had as good a week as I did. Basically it was a pretty quiet week. We only ventured out one time to go to the movies. I’ll tell you about that at the end.

In my reading I concentrated on William Kent Krueger. I read two of his books this week. The book I read was Blood Hollow. Its the fourth book in the author’s Cork O’Connor series. There was a lot in this novel. Whew! It all started with a missing teenager girl whose dead body was discovered weeks later. There wasn’t a lot of evidence so the sheriff arrested the girl’s boyfriend. The boyfriend’s mother asked Cork’s wife, Jo, to be his attorney and Cork to investigate further. Since the boyfriend, Solemn, has run away, Cork first has to find him.

There are so many obstacles in this case: lots of secrets, resentments that go back decades, a sheriff who cares more about politics, and a new detective working for the sheriff that no one knows much about. If that’s not enough to muddle the waters, Cork learns the accused had a vision of Jesus. When a couple of healings occur, people descend on this small town in droves. The conclusion was surprising and dynamic.

I also read The Devil’s Bed, a stand-alone by William Kent Krueger. It’s a complicated thriller set at the presidential level. Let me share just a bit of the publisher’s blurb:

When President Clay Dixon’s father-in-law—a former vice president—is injured in a farming accident, First Lady Kate Dixon returns to Minnesota to be at his side. Assigned to protect her, Secret Service agent Bo Thorsen soon falls under Kate’s spell. He also suspects the accident is part of a trap set for Kate by David Moses, an escaped mental patient who once loved her. What Bo and Moses don’t realize is that they’re caught in a web of deadly intrigue spun by a seemingly insignificant bureaucratic department within the federal government.

On the Big Screen:

First, I must say that I am thrilled that there was something good to see at our local movie theater. Its been a long time and not because we aren’t available to go. The local theater doesn’t seem to be interested in showing movies without guns, car chases, or zombies. (Oh my, that did sound like a statement from an old woman! Sorry about that.)  Anyway, we did jump at the chance to see Manchester By the Sea.

It’s a beautifully acted drama. Lee, played by Casey Affleck, becomes the guardian of Patrick, played by Lucas Hedges, when Jack, Lee’s brother and Patrick’s father dies. Lee lives in Boston and seems to have a lot of personal problems. But, he reluctantly moves up to Manchester to take care of sixteen-year-old Patrick. Patrick is not a bad kid, but definitely a full-fledged sixteen-year-old. He’s also having trouble handling the death of his father.

The film uses a series of flashbacks to tell us the whole story of Lee. Overall, the story was sad. It didn’t make us depressed, but we really felt so sad for all the people involved. Its been nominated for several awards and I can see why. It’s well worth watching, if you get the chance.

That’a it for my quiet week. I hope you have a good one.

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Wondrous Words #382

WWWEvery week word-lovers post new words they’ve discovered while reading. It’s called Wondrous Words Wednesday and was created by Kathy at Bermuda Onion’s Weblog.

I found two words on Politico while reading an interesting article about the history of journalism’s methods. Both words were in one sentence:

As they see it, such imprecations could inform the public about the president’s incessant mendacity or at least provide a morally clear and refreshingly blunt description of his modus operandi.

Imprecation (imprəˈkāSH(ə)n) is a noun meaning a spoken curse.

Mendacity:  (menˈdasədē)  is also a noun meaning untruthfulness.

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That’s it for me this week. I hope you found some words worth celebrating. Feel free to join Wondrous Words Wednesday. Be sure to visit Kathy for the details.

Posted in Wondrous Words | 3 Comments