My Reading Challenges For 2017

Every year I love to join up with fellow readers in various challenges. I’ve been known to join 10 to 15 in previous years. This year it’s going to be just a few. These are the areas of reading that I really care about.

First of all is the GoodRead Challenge in which I keep track of the number of books I read.

Reading Challenge

Goal: 115

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I also like to keep track of how many books I’m reading from my local library. It’s important to me to support local libraries.

2017 Library Love Challenge

Library Love

Library Card on Fire Level: 50+books

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I began the Foodies Read Challenge several years ago and still love to join in each year.

Foodies Read

Goal: 10

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I’ve been a part of this challenge ever since my friend at Beth Fish Reads took over the challenge. Although she no longer manages it, I still like to try to match my book titles to the various categories. Last year I only managed to get one, but I feel more confident this year. Wish me luck.

What’s In A Name?

Goal: 6

1. A number in numbers

2. A building

3. A title which has an ‘X’ somewhere in it

4. A compass direction

5. An item/items of cutlery

6. A title in which at least two words share the same first letter – alliteration!

 

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Wondrous Words #378

WWWEvery week word-lovers post new words they’ve discovered while reading. It’s called Wondrous Words Wednesday and was created by Kathy at Bermuda Onion’s Weblog.

I found a new-to-me word in an Audible editor’s review of Fishbowl by Bradley Somer. In this sentence, the fish is describing what he sees as he is flying from the window of a high-rise apartment.

agoraphobic: “ . . . a time-travelling home-schooled boy, and an agoraphobic sex worker.”

Agoraphobic (aɡ(ə)rəˈfōbik) means extreme or irrational fear of crowded spaces or enclosed public places.

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I was reading a blurb about American Wife and thought I should have known this word:

inured: Comfortable in her quiet and unassuming life, she felt inured to his charms.

Inured (əˈn(y)o͝or ) means to be accustomed to something or someone, especially something or someone unpleasant.

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That’s it for me this week. I hope you found some words worth celebrating. Feel free to join Wondrous Words Wednesday. Be sure to visit Kathy for the details.

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What Am I Reading? The Likeness

Last year I “discovered” Tana French’s Dublin-based novels. They are especially good in audiobook with the narrator’s Irish brogue. I’m a few chapters in and I’m thoroughly enjoying the main character, an undercover cop who looks exactly like the murder victim. Here’s how the story begins:

1.
This is Lexi Madison’s story, not mine. I’d love to tell you one without the other, but it doesn’t work that way. I used to think I sewed us together at the edges with my own hands, pulled the stitches tight and I could unpick them anytime I wanted. Now I think it always ran deeper than that and farther, underground; out of sight and way beyond my control.

 

What do you think?

Would you keep reading?

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firstparagraphEvery Tuesday Diane at Bibliophile By the Sea shares the first paragraph of a book currently being read. Feel free to join the fun.

 

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Wondrous Words #377

WWWEvery week word-lovers post new words they’ve discovered while reading. It’s called Wondrous Words Wednesday and was created by Kathy at Bermuda Onion’s Weblog.

I recently read the modern retelling of Emma by Alexander McCall Smith. In it I found one new word:

pedant: “You are such a pedant!” Emma shouted at George.

Pedant is a person who is excessively concerned with minor details and rules or with displaying academic learning

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I found this word several weeks ago, but now I’m hearing it everywhere. It’s worth noting. I found it in an article in Politico Magazine and was about the president-elect.

emolument: “They say a competitor’s lawsuit could be used as a way to enforce the Constitution’s “foreign emolument” clause . . .”

Emolument (əˈmälyəmənt) is a noun meaning a salary, fee, or profit from employment or office. prohibits U.S. officials from accepting gifts or benefits from foreign governments without permission from Congress.

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That’s it for me this week. I hope you found some words worth celebrating. Feel free to join Wondrous Words Wednesday. Be sure to visit Kathy for the details.

Posted in Wondrous Words | 2 Comments