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Hi! My name is Margot. My blog is about the things I love to do. That could be what I'm reading, places we visit, my family, food, or whatever else is happening. I hope you'll stay and visit a while. Contact me by email: joyfullyretired (at) gmail (dot) com.

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Wondrous Words #160

It’s Wednesday! Time for me to share my new-to-me words. Today I’m paying tribute to the New York Times and their big word writers. Here are three new words from three articles I read recently:

1.  I found vicissitude in a review of the book Half-Broke Horses.

Walls revisits the adrenaline-charged frontier background that gave her own mother a lifelong taste for vicissitude.

Vicissitude means a change of circumstances or fortune, typically one that is unwelcome or unpleasant

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2.  While reading their review of Salvage the Bones I found protean.

She already knows that nature is protean and mischievous, that the gods tumble to earth to chase mortal women, girls can turn into trees, a hurricane can laugh, and the creek will rise out of its bed and wend its way into her house “to eat and play.”

 Protean means being able to do many things, or versatile.

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3.  And, in an interesting article titled It Could Be Old Age, or It Could Be Low B12, I found sublingual.

Although most doctors are quick to recommend injections to correct a B12 deficiency, considerable evidence indicates that, in large enough doses, sublingual tablets or skin patches of B12 may work as well as injections for people with absorption problems, even for those with pernicious anemia.

Sublingual means under-the-tongue.

Wondrous Words Wednesday is sponsored by Kathy at Bermuda Onion. Visit her for more new words.

9 comments to Wondrous Words #160

  • Protean is an interesting word – I haven’t heard that before. Thanks for sharing!

  • I swear I’ve looked up sublingual so many times. Every time I see it I question that I know what it means. It’s a real problem word for me. The others are new to me, I never thought to use words from newspapers or magazines.

  • I feel like I should have known sublingual but I didn’t. When I look at the make up of the word I don’t know why I can’t remember it. Those are all great words!

  • I’ve seen sublingual a couple of times – I think I thought it meant under the skin which of course, is subcutaneous. Thanks for reminding me. And protean is another one I’ve heard of but didn’t quite know the meaning of. What a wondrous word, indeed! I can’t for the life of me pronounce vicissitude so I won’t ever learn it, dang it.

  • Great words..even though a few are new to me I was able to figure out what they meant!

  • I see I’ve been holding onto the wrong definition for “protean” all this time! I always think it has something to do with nature, for some reason. Good to know what it really means!

  • Hi Margot,

    Some great words, from some interesting sources this week.

    I already know of vicissitude, however both your other words were new to me.

    I think that most women should be able to describe themselves as protean, it sounds much better than being able to multi-task and would be a great one to drop into a conversation, I must try it!

    Interesting post,

    Yvonne

  • It’s always such a thrill isn’t it when you know all of someone’s words for the week? I use sublingual most days at work. Protean is a fantastic word which I do use from time to time. I don’t use vicissitudes all that often, another wonderful sounding word though.

  • I’ve seen sublingual a couple of times – i think I thought it meant under the skin which of course, is subcutaneous. thank you for reminding me. And protean is another one I’ve heard of but didn’t quite know the meaning of. What a wondrous word, indeed! I can’t for the life of me pronounce vicissitude so I won’t ever learn it, dang it.