Wondrous Words #45

wondrous2Many thanks to Kathy/Bermuda Onion for gathering us together weekly to share the words we’ve discovered in our reading this week. I found several while reading the daily serialized novel of Alexander McCall Smith – The Dog Who Came in From the Cold.

1. treacle: Five minutes in my brother’s company and I’m already wading in a morass of intellectual treacle.

Treacle means: British term for molasses OR a figurative cloying sentimentality or flattery.

2. specious: The owner was puzzled, until the realisation dawned: her customers were buying the dresses purely in order to wear them to Sunday brunches and lunches at friends’ houses before returning them for specious reasons later in the afternoon.

Specious means superficially plausible, but actually wrong.

I can always count on fellow bloggers for new-to-me words. Here’s one from Cathy at Kittling: Books:

The customs of the native peoples, how the whites lived and behaved, the landscape, the weather, the architecture… all of these things brought such verisimilitude to the book that I would rank The Witch Doctor’s Wife right up there with Alexander McCall Smith and Michael Stanley.
verisimilitude |ˌverəsəˈmiliˌt(y)oōd|
noun
the appearance of being true or real : the detail gives the novel some verisimilitude.

3.  verisimilitude: The customs of the native peoples, how the whites lived and behaved, the landscape, the weather, the architecture… all of these things brought such verisimilitude to the book that I would rank The Witch Doctor’s Wife right up there with Alexander McCall Smith and Michael Stanley.

verisimilitude means the appearance of being true or real : the detail gives the novel some verisimilitude.

It’s so much fun to look for and track down new words. How about you? Did you find any new words this week?

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7 Responses to Wondrous Words #45

  1. Kathy says:

    You always find the best words! I’ve seen treacle before, but I always thought it meant a mother’s milk. Boy, was I way off! Thanks for setting me straight and participating today.

  2. Don’t you love how many different words the British have? That’s my very favorite aspect of British books!

  3. WordLily says:

    I actually know these ones, but I love how they feel in my mouth. :) Really fun words.

  4. Sherrie says:

    Hi Margot,
    I’ve heard your words before, but wasn’t that sure of what they meant. Thanks for sharing. Have a great day!

    Sherrie
    Just Books

  5. I’m impressed that a real person used “verisimilitude” on her blog. :-) Great list.

  6. Staci says:

    I always feel like a poorly-read person when I read these words!! :)

  7. As a future therapist, I am sure I will experience lots of speciousness. :) I am curious how synonymous verisimilitude is with genuineness. So I’m off to investigate. Thanks for teaching me new words!

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